burnedshoes:

© Roman Vishniac, early 1930, People behind bars, Berlin Zoo
Roman Vishniac was well known for documenting Jewish life in Eastern Europe before the start of the Holocaust. From 1935-1938 he created some of the most recognizable and replicated images of the era, but his work didn’t end there. The Vishniac archive spans 60 years: starting in the early ‘20s in Berlin and ending in the late ‘70s in New York and until recently most of it had never been seen.
“Until we started doing this research, he was only known for four years of work,” says Maya Benton, ICP’s curator of the Vishniac Archive. “They’re tremendously powerful and iconic photographic records, but were also only four years of a 60 year working life. I think that his unpublished work really puts him on par with the great photographers of the 20th century.”
At the end of August The International Center of Photography and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum launched the groundbreaking joint archive project that was nearly a decade in the making: a digital, searchable database featuring 40,000 objects from Vishniac’s massive collection. (read more here and here)

burnedshoes:

© Roman Vishniac, early 1930, People behind bars, Berlin Zoo

Roman Vishniac was well known for documenting Jewish life in Eastern Europe before the start of the Holocaust. From 1935-1938 he created some of the most recognizable and replicated images of the era, but his work didn’t end there. The Vishniac archive spans 60 years: starting in the early ‘20s in Berlin and ending in the late ‘70s in New York and until recently most of it had never been seen.

“Until we started doing this research, he was only known for four years of work,” says Maya Benton, ICP’s curator of the Vishniac Archive. “They’re tremendously powerful and iconic photographic records, but were also only four years of a 60 year working life. I think that his unpublished work really puts him on par with the great photographers of the 20th century.”

At the end of August The International Center of Photography and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum launched the groundbreaking joint archive project that was nearly a decade in the making: a digital, searchable database featuring 40,000 objects from Vishniac’s massive collection. (read more here and here)